Welcome to the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service – Terry County!!  It is the goal of this office to provide relevant outreach and continuing education programs to the people of Terry County.  Through field based faculty, Extension provides unbiased, research-based information, educational programs and technical assistance in the following areas: Agriculture, Community & Economic Development, Integrated Pest Management, Nutrition, Diet and Health and 4-H and Youth Development.  Please choose a link below to learn more about the services we provide.

New to Terry County? Read on for more helpful information…

Terry County, located on the southern High Plains of West Texas, has an area of 899 square miles and an elevation of 3,100 to 3,600 feet. The primary roads are U.S. highways 62/82, 385, and 380 and State Highway 137. The land is level, broken by draws and playas with sandy loam soils. There are no rivers or streams, and drainage is through draws, which form the upper watershed of Sulphur Springs Creek. Sand hills dominate the northeast corner of the county. The average annual rainfall is 17.21 inches. The average minimum temperature in January is 26 degrees F; the average maximum in July is 93 degrees. The growing season averages 206 days. Agricultural profits average $63 million annually, 90 percent from cotton. The county is among the state leaders in cotton production. Sorghum is also produced, and cattle are raised. Most of the county’s 144,000 acres of irrigated land is planted in cotton. Manufacturing accounts for an income of $4.5 million annually in irrigation equipment, carbon black, fertilizers, and process minerals. In 1982 nearly 14.5 million barrels of oil valued at $451 million and some sodium sulfate were produced.